Wednesday, November 11, 2015

We Thank You For You Service and Sacrifice

We honor all our men & women in uniform, past, present, and future. Thank You for your service and courage. We thought we would share some history about our Veterans on their day. 

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day–a common misunderstanding, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Memorial Day (the fourth Monday in May) honors American service members who died in service to their 
country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle, while Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans–living or dead–but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

The First Veterans Day

Alvin J. King, the uncle of John Cooper, a soldier killed in World War II, approached his congressman, Edward J. Rees, and asked that Armistice Day be changed to a holiday that would honor all veterans from all wars. Congressman Rees did as asked and on June 1, 1954, 
Many Americans thought that the date of Veterans Day was much too important to be altered, and in 1975, Congress changed the law. Since 1978, Veterans Day has been held on Nov. 11.

Veterans Day Facts & Stats 

  • In 1954, President Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day. 
  • In 1968, the Uniform Holidays Bill was passed by Congress, which moved the celebration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. The law went into effect in 1971, but in 1975 President Ford returned Veterans Day to November 11, due to the important historical significance of the date.
  • Britain, France, Australia and Canada also commemorate the veterans of World Wars I and II on or near November 11th: Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday (the second Sunday of November). 
  • In Europe, Britain and the Commonwealth countries it is common to observe two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. every November 11.
  • George Patton, the famous World War II American military officer, was born on November 11, in 1885. Although he was born before Veterans Day was established, it is interesting that this famous war heroes shares his birthday with a day that honors veterans live now.
  • There are approximately 23.2 million military veterans in the United States.
  • 9.2 million veterans are over the age of 65.
  • 1.9 million veterans are under the age of 35.
  • 1.8 million veterans are women.
  • 7.8 million veterans served during the Vietnam War era (1964-1975), which represents 33% of all living veterans.
  • 5.2 million veterans served during the Gulf War (representing service from Aug. 2, 1990, to present).
  • 2.6 million veterans served during World War II (1941-1945).
  • 2.8 million veterans served during the Korean War (1950-1953).
  • 6 million veterans served in peacetime.

The brave men and women who serve and protect the U.S. come from all walks of life; they are parents, children and grandparents. They are friends, neighbors and coworkers, and an important part of their communities. If you know a Veteran or see one, be sure to thank them for their service. Today and every day. 

Monday, November 2, 2015

Open Enrollment started November 1st!

Consumers can go to preview 2016 plans and prices available in your area. 

It’s easy for you to compare available 2016 plans. You only need to answer a few simple questions to preview plans in your area and see what savings may be available to you for next year. You don’t need to log in, just use the                                                    link below to get started.

It’s important to shop around and see what 2016 plan best fits your needs and budget. 8 out of 10 people who enrolled in a health insurance plan qualified for financial help. In fact, most people can find a health insurance plan for $75 or less per month. 

Be sure check out our Obamacare page for The LL Roberts Group. For more information on how a PEO can address your company’s employee benefit needs, feel free to contact a PEO Representative at the LL Roberts Group (toll free) at 877.8578.6463. 

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween is one of the most exciting times of the year for children, but sometimes hectic for parents and guardians. This Halloween, take a moment to consider basic safety precautions to help make your children’s Halloween a safer night of fun.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Time Systems in the News!

Pretty cool write up about our time and attendance division  "Time Systems".  We offer our PEO clients major discounts vs. going out and getting this on your own. Click here to see the whole article on MSN Money's website. 

You don't have to be a PEO client to get deep discounts on our Time & Attendance service. If you are interested or just want to find out more, call us Toll Free at 877.878.6463 or email 

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Working Safely In Hot Temperatures

With all the record high temps parts of the country has this summer, it's time to review how hot conditions put your body under a lot of stress. Physical activity stresses the body even more. When heat is combined with physical activity, loss of fluids, fatigue, and other conditions can lead to a number of heat-related illnesses and injuries. Death is even possible. This week's blog discusses ways to prevent heat stress and how to recognize the symptoms of heat-stress conditions.
Warm weather increases the number of heat-stress injuries and illnesses, but Heat stress can occur any time the surrounding temperature is elevated. Even if the weather is cool, you may work in warm areas, indoors or out.
The main factors that are involved in causing heat stress include:
  • temperature  &  humidity
  • movement of air & radiant temperature of the surroundings
  • clothing & physical activity
Adjusting to these factors and/or controlling them may reduce the chance of heat stress. Your body can adjust to working in a warm environment through a process known as "acclimatization". Check with your company's safety people for the exact way to properly acclimatize yourself.  Keep in mind, though, even if you're already acclimatized, conditions can change which stress your body even more. Bright sunshine, high humidity, and sources of heat in the workplace can affect your body's ability to cool itself. If conditions change, make sure you re-acclimate yourself to the new conditions.
Engineering controls implemented to reduce the possibility of heat stress include:
  • control the heat source through use of insulation and reflective barriers
  • exhaust hot air or steam away from the work area
  • use of air-conditioning & use of air-conditioned rest areas
  • use of fans to circulate the air
Administrative controls to prevent heat stress injuries include:
  • increase  frequency and duration of rest breaks
  • schedule tasks to avoid physical activity during the hottest parts of the day
  • provide cool water and encourage consumption
  • use additional jobsite workers or slow the pace of the work
  • review  the signs and symptoms of heat stress with workforce
There are a number of types of heat stress injuries. Some are annoying but not very serious. Others can quickly lead to life-threatening situations. Knowing what to look out for is important. This is especially true because the more serious heat stress conditions cause the victim to become disoriented and unaware of his/her condition. People who are overweight, physically unfit, suffer from heart conditions, drink too much alcohol or are not acclimated to the temperature are at greater risk of heat stress and should seek and follow medical advice. The major heat stress injuries and illnesses are described here:

Heat Rash is caused by a hot, humid environment and plugged sweat glands. It is a bumpy red rash which itches severely. It is not life-threatening but is very annoying.
Heat Cramps are painful muscle cramps caused by a loss of body salt through excessive sweating. To help prevent heat cramps, drink plenty of non-alcoholic, caffeine-free fluids while working in a hot environment.
Heat Syncope (pronounced "sin-co-pay") is sudden fainting caused by a reduced blood flow to the head. The victim's skin will be cool and moist and his/her pulse will be weak. Immediate medical attention is needed in the event of syncope.
Heat Exhaustion results from inadequate salt and water intake and is a sign the body's cooling system is not working properly. The victim will sweat heavily, their skin will be cool and moist and their pulse weak. They will seem tired, confused, clumsy, irritable or upset. They may breathe rapidly, even pant, and their vision may be blurred. The victim may strongly argue that they are okay even with these obvious symptoms. If you suspect heat exhaustion, don't let the victim talk you out of seeking immediate medical attention. The heat exhaustion will affect their ability to exercise good judgment. Until medical help arrives, try to cool the victim and offer sips of cool water as long as the victim is conscious. Immediate medical attention is required. Heat exhaustion can quickly lead to heat stroke.
Heat Stroke is the deadliest of all heat stress conditions. It occurs when the body's cooling mechanism has shut down after extreme loss of salt and fluids. Here, the body temperature will rise, the victim's skin will be hot, red, and dry. Their pulse is fast, and they may complain of headache or dizziness. They will probably be weak, confused, and upset. Later stages of heat stroke cause a loss of consciousness and may lead to convulsions. In the event of heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention. Until help arrives, try to cool the victim and offer sips of cool water if the victim is conscious.

Recognizing the symptoms of heat stress is very important, particularly since the victim may not realize what is happening. If you work alone in a hot environment, develop a "buddy system" so someone will check in on you periodically to look for signs of heat stress.
Preventing heat stress is a matter of controlling the factors that cause it. Use the precautions mentioned in this article, and don't hesitate to seek assistance if you suspect heat stress. Your good health depends on it!
If you have any questions concerning heat stress and how you can improve your employees safety, please contact the LL Roberts Group PEO Risk Management department (toll free) at 877.878.6463. You can even talk to us on Facebook or Twitter!

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Aetna is buying Humana ~ So what happens next?

Aetna will acquire Humana for a reported $37 Billion. The newly combined company will have more than 33 million members.

This huge deal follows other proposed or rumored moves to merge or consolidate by U.S. health insurance companies, such as: Anthem’s interested in buying Cigna, and UnitedHealth’s previously reported interest in buying either Aetna or Humana. Many fear that these consolidations will result in fewer health carriers with much greater power. Basically, fewer insurers with more clout could raise premiums and reduce the number of doctors and hospitals in network coverage plans.

The Affordable Care Act or Obamacare has been a mixed blessing for the health insurance industry. It's created more business for major insurers because more Americans now have health coverage; however many say that the law has put more pressure on health carriers to generate profits.

So how does this industry consolidation this impact insurance agents and brokers?

Obamacare had already impacted the Life and Health Insurance broker community, now as industry consolidating occurs fewer solutions exist for brokers and their clients.  Making matters more complex (if not dire) are reports that Aetna is considering a plan to eliminate commissions built into group health plan premiums.   Of course, we’ve already seen many agencies and agents move (or attempt to move) towards collecting “consulting fees” from clients in lieu of commissions.  Many of those agents or brokers have shared with us that this concept has not been well received amongst their clientele.  Is this the future for how brokers must be compensated, billing your clients separate and apart from their policy premiums?

A result of this confusion and concern might very well be, yet another motivation to affiliate with a PEO or PEO Broker.  PEO’s can provide Insurance Agents or brokers another means of addressing their client’s health care needs while providing the agent/broker with a reoccurring revenue stream. For more information on how a PEO can solve many of your client’s employee administration and health care needs please contact the LL Roberts Group at 877.878.6463 and ask one of our Professional PEO Consultants about how you can use a PEO to better serve your clients while generating commissions for you and/or your agency. To learn more about PEOs and the LL Roberts Group visit our website at  You can even talk to us on Facebook or Twitter!

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Staying Safe in Spring Weather

Now that Spring is here and several parts of the country are getting more than it's fair share of rain and might be in line to re-write water level records. This Spring has already proven to be volatile for some parts of the country and will continue to be dangerous as the weather heats up. We know that Spring weather can be very unpredictable, and just as unstable, but not everyone understands the dangers that accompany severe weather. Severe weather affects everyone with the potential for tornados, thunderstorms, lightning, flooding, and even hurricanes in some parts of the country. Severe or violent weather threatens everyone, but the truth is, the majority of people and businesses are not prepared. Having a game plan can save lives and property when Spring weather turns violent.

Some people think these are no big deal, but thunderstorms are dangerous. There are several associated dangers of thunderstorms including tornadoes, strong winds, hail, lightning, and flash flooding. The most dangerous situation arises when a single thunderstorm affects one location for an extended period of time. Thunderstorms typically produce rain for a brief period, anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. A severe storm produces hail at least three quarters of an inch in diameter, has winds of 58 miles per hour or higher, or produces a tornado.

A “Severe Thunderstorm Watch” tells you when and where severe thunderstorms are likely to occur. Watch the sky and stay tuned to a radio or television for information. A “Severe Thunderstorm Warning” is issued when severe weather has been witnessed by spotters or by radar. A warning indicates danger to life and property to those in the path of the storm. You should take cover immediately.

Remember the 30/30 lightning safety rule: Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you can’t count to 30 before hearing thunder. If possible, stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder. Stay alert to your surrounding and always use good judgment when making decisions that could have lasting effects on friends, families, and co-workers.

On the average, 90 people die each year in the United States from lightning strikes. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, there are some things you can do to protect yourself from lightning: 

  • Get inside a building immediately. If you have to stay outside, keep away from metal objects and stay below ground level. Avoid hilltops, open beaches, or fields; most importantly, stay away from open water and tall trees.
  • Seek shelter inside your car. If you feel your hair standing on end, squat with your head between your knees. Do not lie flat.
  • Avoid using the telephone or other electrical devices. Do not take a bath, shower or stand near plumbing.

QUICK FACT: Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. “Heat Lightning” is actually from a thunderstorm too far away for thunder to be heard. Lightning kills more Americans than tornadoes and hurricanes each year. 

We have all seen the news about vehicles which  tried to cross a flooded street, often with tragic results. Even a four-wheel drive vehicle isn’t safe in high water areas. Flash floods have surprising lifting power. Water displaces 1,500 pounds of weight for every foot it rises. If a car weighs 3,000 pounds, it takes only two feet of water to send it downstream. It only takes 6 inches of water to sweep a person off his/her feet. One foot of water can cause a compact vehicle to lose control and “float” away. Once the car is swept away, the vehicle may become a death trap because the electric windows and door locks can short out when water reaches them, trapping the occupants inside. Do not drive through high water or flooded areas. Observe all warning signs and don’t take any chances with your or life.

Spring is a prime time spawning ground for tornadoes. If a tornado is spotted in your area, here are some tips to follow and help keep you safe: 

  • Go low and get low. - Go to the lowest level of the structure you are in. If you are at home when a tornado strikes, go to the innermost part of the home on the lowest floor such as a bathroom or closet, preferably an enclosure  with no windows.
  • Crouch or lie down, cover and protect your head. If you live in a mobile home, go outside, and lie flat in a ditch or ravine.
  • If you are in an office building, go to the designated safe area for tornadoes. If you can’t get there in time, stay in an interior hallway or basement.
  • Do not take cover in your car. If you are driving down the road and see a tornado, leave your car immediately. If you have time, get inside a building. If not, lie flat in a ditch or ravine and cover your head with your arms.

QUICK FACT: A “Tornado Watch” watch means “watch” the sky. Weather conditions are right for tornadoes to form. A “Tornado Warning” means a tornado has been sighted or identified on radar. Take cover immediately. 
If you have any questions any information found in this posting, please contact the LL Roberts Group PEO Risk Management department (toll free) at 877.878.6463. You can even talk to us on Facebook!